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arrogance

The role of conviction in intercultural competence/citizenship

The role of conviction in intercultural competence/citizenship

Posted on 21 October 2019 by ,

In the previous blog we investigated the relationship between intellectual humility (owning the limitations of one’s knowledge) and intercultural citizenship (applying the knowledge, skills and attitudes of intercultural competence to […]

What makes arrogant people so angry?

What makes arrogant people so angry?

Posted on 22 April 2019 by

Arrogant people are often intolerant of questioning or criticism. They respond to genuine and even polite challenges with anger. They are bullies that attempt to humiliate and intimidate those who […]

The Heart of Justice

The Heart of Justice

Posted on 4 June 2018 by

The ancient Greeks all thought of morality in terms of the virtues: justice, courage, temperance, and wisdom. And they all thought of the virtues as if they are like skills […]

Poisonous Words: Arrogance, Bullshit and Accusations of Lying in Public Discourse

Poisonous Words: Arrogance, Bullshit and Accusations of Lying in Public Discourse

Posted on 23 April 2018 by

As is common with international incidents today, the Skripal case, in which a Russian double agent and his daughter were poisoned with a nerve agent in Salisbury, England, has generated […]

Intellectual Humility and Conviction

Intellectual Humility and Conviction

Posted on 12 March 2018 by

Here is a puzzle. On the one hand, we laud people in public life for their conviction, for sticking to their principles come what may. Indeed, we take to be […]

Arrogance and the Space of Reasons

Arrogance and the Space of Reasons

Posted on 29 January 2018 by

  A democracy is more than a form of government; it is primarily a mode of associated living, of conjoining communicated experience. ---John Dewey   One of the truly baffling […]

What is Google Doing to Us?

What is Google Doing to Us?

Posted on 4 December 2017 by ,

By J. Adam Carter and Emma C. Gordon Suppose you wanted to know who the first pope was after St. Peter (answer: Pope Linus, born 10 AD), or what the […]

Bad Questions Lead to Bad Democracy

Bad Questions Lead to Bad Democracy

Posted on 9 October 2017 by

In a previous post, I discussed the essential role that questions play in the political landscape of contemporary democracy. The ability to ask questions, and to ask good ones at […]

Hubris as Prime Ministerial Vice

Hubris as Prime Ministerial Vice

Posted on 31 July 2017 by

When Theresa May’s snap election backfired decimating her majority, many commentators were quick to use a language of vices to describe her errors. ‘May’s astounding arrogance has now paved the […]

Arrogant Pride and Alternative Facts

Arrogant Pride and Alternative Facts

Posted on 17 July 2017 by

"Pride...is a very common failing" (Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice). What Austen calls "pride" is these days better described as arrogant pride to distinguish it from the rightful pride of […]

Collaboration versus point scoring

Collaboration versus point scoring

Posted on 5 June 2017 by

Last Monday we held the first workshop associated with the project Changing Attitudes in Public Debate. The workshop was by invitation and designed to bring together some philosophers, social psychologists […]

Reducing arrogance in debate

Reducing arrogance in debate

Posted on 19 May 2017 by

In many Western democracies, public opinion seems to have become bitterly divided over increasingly divisive topics like immigration, Brexit, and the qualities of Donald J. Trump. People whose convictions are […]

We are now open for debate

We are now open for debate

Posted on 18 May 2017 by

Welcome to 'Open for Debate', a blog associated with the project Changing Attitudes in Public Discourse. We hope to use this space to debate all aspects and forms of debate. Ultimately, […]