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Is being resilient an unfair burden?

Is being resilient an unfair burden?

Posted on 11 July 2022 by

Navigating the world of public debate can be a difficult task. There are many hurdles to overcome in the process of finding out about and sharing one’s views on social […]

Egotism in Higher Education

Egotism in Higher Education

Posted on 9 August 2021 by

By Tracy Llanera and Nicholas Smith Crisis or no crisis, vice-chancellors in Australia remain exorbitantly well-paid. While most of them committed to pay cuts in 2020 in response to the […]

Places of formation: Cultivating open-mindedness amongst university students

Places of formation: Cultivating open-mindedness amongst university students

Posted on 30 December 2019 by

Bethan Willis                             Ed Brooks In the ongoing discussions around Brexit our relationship to place, near and far, […]

The role of conviction in intercultural competence/citizenship

The role of conviction in intercultural competence/citizenship

Posted on 21 October 2019 by ,

In the previous blog we investigated the relationship between intellectual humility (owning the limitations of one’s knowledge) and intercultural citizenship (applying the knowledge, skills and attitudes of intercultural competence to […]

Do intercultural Citizens need to be intellectually humble?

Do intercultural Citizens need to be intellectually humble?

Posted on 7 October 2019 by ,

By Manuela Wagner and Michael Byram The late Paddy Ashdown, British politician and diplomat, emphasized in 2012 “In the modern age, where everything is connected to everything, the most important […]

Teaching Intellectual Humility

Teaching Intellectual Humility

Posted on 24 September 2018 by

We have good reason for wanting to teach and instill the virtue of intellectual humility. Those with this virtue are more cooperative, want to learn more, are more forgiving, are […]

Applying Findings from Neuroscience to Education in Practice and Educational Policy-Making

Applying Findings from Neuroscience to Education in Practice and Educational Policy-Making

Posted on 10 September 2018 by

In this blog post, the last post of my post series, I intend to outline, by means of concrete examples, how findings from neuroscience can contribute practically to the improvement […]

Identifying Core Psychological Processes with Neuroimaging Experiments to Improve Education in Practice

Identifying Core Psychological Processes with Neuroimaging Experiments to Improve Education in Practice

Posted on 27 August 2018 by

Following my previous post for this blog, in this post I discuss why examining psychological processes related to teaching and learning can provide useful insights about how to improve education. Many […]

Improving moral education through neuroscience

Improving moral education through neuroscience

Posted on 13 August 2018 by

Thanks to the rapid development of science and technology, scholars interested in morality now have more sophisticated ways to do their research. To date, relatively simple methods, such as the […]

Ruminating on Fake News, Online Education, and Intellectual Humility

Ruminating on Fake News, Online Education, and Intellectual Humility

Posted on 18 June 2018 by

From 2015 until last month (May, 2018), I was involved with a project at the University of Edinburgh, which aimed to produce a massive open online course (or MOOC) on […]

Good Democracy Needs Good Questions

Good Democracy Needs Good Questions

Posted on 25 September 2017 by

“If you were president, what would you do about Syria and the humanitarian crisis in Aleppo?” This question was asked to both candidates at the second U.S. presidential debate, during […]