Open for Debate

#YouShouldBelieveHer

Posted on 29 June 2020 by Mona Simion

We believe what other people tell us. I trust that you are on the way to the mall if you tell me you are on the way to the mall; I believe that the price of oil has gone down because I heard it on the news. In the summer I will go hiking in
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The epistemic predicament of the conspiracy theorist

Posted on 15 June 2020 by Tommaso Piazza

A group of international public health scientists has recently published a statement in the prestigious medical journal The Lancet about the origins of the Sars-CoV-2 virus, the pathogen responsible for the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic. In their statement, they report that on the basis of the publication and analysis of its genomes, scientists from
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Ethicists, hold your horses (Part 1)

Posted on 18 May 2020 by Fleur Jongepier

    Fleur Jongepier                         Karin Jongsma If intensive care beds or ventilators run out, who should be saved? And how should such decisions be morally justified? These are horrible, indeed impossible, decisions that clinicians currently face, or may be confronted with in the (near)
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Being an Intellectually Dependable Person

Posted on 4 May 2020 by T. Ryan Byerly

We are often at the mercy of others when we are trying to figure things out. The same is true when we are seeking to gain deeper understanding or to improve our skills for gaining knowledge.  Others can share their perspectives with us. They can point us toward relevant evidence. They can raise important questions
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Following the science: trust, experts, and COVID-19

Posted on 20 April 2020 by Matt Bennett

Students of recent social epistemology could be forgiven for thinking that the world’s social and political problems begin and end with the threat of “fake news”. The thought is that something new and dangerous has emerged at the end of the end of history: a “post-truth” new world order in which populist demagogues deny the
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Skepticism, Tribalism, and Humble Persistence

Posted on 6 April 2020 by Jason Baehr

With many weighty contemporary issues, it is increasingly difficult to know what exactly to believe. This includes issues related to or at the intersection of politics, morality, religion, medicine, and science. Information about these issues is endless. It points in different and inconsistent directions. And its quality can be extremely difficult to discern.
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Which crisis of trust?

Posted on 24 February 2020 by Matt Bennett

The UK Labour Party’s leadership contest is well underway after heavy defeat in the 2019 General Election. There is nothing close to consensus within the Party about why things went wrong, and still very little agreement on the most high-profile political issues. Members could be forgiven, then, for taking solace in one area of apparent
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Social media links

Political Debate in the Digital Age

Posted on 10 February 2020 by Fabienne Peter

In an ideal democratic world, all citizens are invited to debate political necessities and possibilities to the best of their knowledge and to forge their country’s future in this way. In an ideal democratic world, political debate is, in other words, both inclusive and evidence-led. In a dystopian world, by contrast, political debate is exclusive
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Depending on others for knowledge

Posted on 13 January 2020 by Emily Sullivan

We depend on others. We depend on others when we are sick or when we need help moving into a new house. We also depend on others for knowledge. We learn from books written by other people. Children learn from teachers in school. If we are lost in a city, we depend on others to
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Am I Humble? Are You Humble?

Posted on 2 December 2019 by Benjamin Meagher

 If one were to boil the concept of civil public discourse down into a single idea, it may be this: avoid ad hominems. Ideas should be debated, scrutinized, and questioned, but the people making these arguments should be listened to honestly, respected, and treated with dignity. But is it possible for people to listen to
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How To Build A Safer Internet

Posted on 18 November 2019 by Natalie Alana Ashton

Earlier this year, the UK government consulted on an Online Harms White Paper that proposes a new model of social media regulation. The response to the consultation was lukewarm at best, and a consistent theme is that the white paper lacks a robust theoretical underpinning. The Carnegie UK Trust identify “an emphasis on detail” without
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Addressing ethical dilemmas in teaching for intercultural citizenship: the role of IH and conviction

Posted on 4 November 2019 by Manuela Wagner

By Michael Byram  and    Manuela Wagner In the last two blog entries we took a first look at the relationship between teaching for intercultural citizenship (applying the knowledge, skills and attitudes of intercultural competence to solve real world problems in the here and now), intellectual humility (owning the limitations of one’s knowledge), and understanding
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The role of conviction in intercultural competence/citizenship

Posted on 21 October 2019 by Manuela Wagner

In the previous blog we investigated the relationship between intellectual humility (owning the limitations of one’s knowledge) and intercultural citizenship (applying the knowledge, skills and attitudes of intercultural competence to solve real world problems in the here and now). The importance of becoming intercultural citizens, we argue, lies in the complexity of “wicked” problems of
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Do intercultural Citizens need to be intellectually humble?

Posted on 7 October 2019 by Manuela Wagner

By Manuela Wagner and Michael Byram The late Paddy Ashdown, British politician and diplomat, emphasized in 2012 “In the modern age, where everything is connected to everything, the most important thing about what you can do is what you can do with others.” (2012 https://www.youtube.com/watchtime_continue=960&v=zuAj2F54bdo  ). In 2015, 193 world leaders committed to 17 Global
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