Pythagorean Astronomy

Pythagorean Astronomy: The Cosmic Webb

Posted on 6 December 2021 by Chris North

The world of astronomy is eagerly awaiting the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope later in December. The telescope is not without controversy, but is set to revolutionise observations of the cosmos. Prof Pete Hargrave was responsible for building a calibration source for MIRI, the Mid-Infrared Imager, while Dr Tim Davis will be observing
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Multiwavelength views of Pa30

Pythagorean Astronomy: Supernova Detective Story

Posted on 3 October 2021 by Chris North

Way back in 1181 AD, astronomers in China and Japan recorded a “guest star” – something that we’d now call a supernova. Over 800 years later, astronomers made a connection between this ancient observation and more recent studies of a very unusual object that goes by the name of “Parker’s Star”. Prof Quentin Parker, from
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illustration of Comet Bernadinelli-Berstein in the outer solar system

Pythagorean Astronomy: Herding Megacomets

Posted on 29 July 2021 by Chris North

In late June an interesting object was discovered heading inwards from the outer solar system, identified in archival images from a survey of the sky. It was initially thought to be worth keeping an eye on over the next decade or so, as it approaches the orbit of Saturn before heading back out to the
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3D model of LiteBIRD satellite in front of an image of stars, galaxies and the CMB

Pythagorean Astronomy: Cosmic Developments

Posted on 1 July 2021 by Chris North

Our understand of the Universe has changed a great deal in the last 100 years. From Einstein’s theories of relativity and measurements of the expanding Universe, to the discovery of the Cosmic Microwave Background and the mysterious Dark Energy. But what are the current mysteries and unknowns that we still want to uncover? And how
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Pythagorean Astronomy: Revisiting Venus

Posted on 29 April 2021 by Chris North

Last September, a team of scientists led by Professor Jane Greaves announced the detection of a rare gas, phosphine, in the atmosphere of Venus. With no plausible explanations of how it could be there, one possibility remaining was that it was being produced by some sort of microbial life floating in the cloud decks of
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