Pythagorean Astronomy

Pythagorean Astronomy: Happy Birthday JWST!

Posted on 23 December 2022 by Chris North

The 25th December marks an anniversary in the world of astronomy (as well as Sir Isaac Newton’s birthday, of course) – the launch of JWST, the infrared space telescope launched to explore the Universe in unprecedented detail. One year on from launch, Chris North and Edward Gomez look at a few of the results that
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Illustration of the DART spacecraft and LICIACube prior to impact at the Didymos binary system.

Pythagorean Astronomy: On Board with DART

Posted on 2 November 2022 by Chris North

At the end of September, NASA’s DART mission was deliberately crashed into the asteroid Dimorphos. Not carelessness, but a deliberate act with a view to testing planetary defense. After all, if we discover something large heading towards Earth, we might want to be able to nudge it off course. Here in Wales, the Comet Chasers
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Pythagorean Astronomy: Amateur Advances

Posted on 2 July 2022 by Chris North

Amateur astronomers regularly make important contributions to astronomy research. That can be through observations of meteor showers, or images of solar system objects. But it’s not always about pretty pictures, and some amateurs also make measurements that feed into our understanding of a broad range of astronomical phenomena, providing a network of telescopes that far
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An illustration of space debris in orbit around Earth

Pythagorean Astronomy: Space Environmentalism

Posted on 30 May 2022 by Chris North

In the 65 years since Sputnik 1 was launched in 1957, the number of artificial satellites in orbit has been increasing. In the last two years, the number of satellites has doubled, largely thanks to the huge “constellations” launched by companies such as SpaceX. The number of satellites has a detrimental impact on astronomical observations,
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Artist’s impression showing a two-star system where micronovae may occur.

Pythagorean Astronomy: Routine Spaceflight?

Posted on 7 May 2022 by Chris North

It’s not often that a new astronomical phenomenon is named, but this month we have a new one. The name might not be that original, but there have been the first observations of something known as a “micronova”. Lasting just a few hours, a micronova is much fainter than a typical “nova”, making them much
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Rosalind Franklin rover on the surface of Mars

Pythagorean Astronomy: Shadow of war

Posted on 30 March 2022 by Chris North

With the invasion of Ukraine casting a shadow over the world, Chris North and Edward Gomez (returning from a long hiatus!) look at the impact of the war on astronomy and space science, mindful that these pale in importance when compared with the death and destruction taking place on the ground. From the international collaboration
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Venus as seen by Akatsuki

Pythagorean Astronomy: Venus resurfaces

Posted on 1 March 2022 by Chris North

Back in September 2020, the new broke that an unexpected gas, phosphine had been discovered in the atmosphere of Venus. While plans for making further measurements are progressing, the theoreticians have been hard at work modelling the atmosphere, and trying to explain how life could possibly exist in such a harsh environment Dr William Bains,
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