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Not Waving But Drowning…

Over the next few months, the pace of posting on Elections in Wales is likely to slow somewhat. We have no major elections due now for some time; moreover, I have a book that I need to write.

However, do not be too downcast. The blog will certainly continue. One of the things that I will be doing is posting some interesting findings as I come across them in the Welsh Election Study data.

I thought I’d start today with this set, which I think one could classify in the ‘don’t know whether to laugh or cry’ category.

In the immediate post-election survey that we ran with our sample of voters (and non-voters), we tried to see to what extent the various parties’ main slogans had cut through to the electorate. We presented them with the main slogans from the six parties that were represented in the main leaders’ debates. And we asked people if they could identify which party that slogan belonged to. To prevent people googling the answers, they were given only a limited amount of time to answer each one. (I believe they had 30 seconds only for each slogan).

So this is what we found. In the series of tables below I highlight in bold the party that was the correct answer in each case.

 

‘Together for Wales’

Labour 11%
Conservatives 3%
Plaid Cymru 9%
Liberal Democrats 3%
UKIP 1%
Greens 2%
Don’t Know 72%

 

‘Securing Real Change for Wales’

Labour 4%
Conservatives 7%
Plaid Cymru 9%
Liberal Democrats 3%
UKIP 4%
Greens 2%
Don’t Know 71%

 

 

‘The Change Wales Needs’

Labour 4%
Conservatives 7%
Plaid Cymru 9%
Liberal Democrats 2%
UKIP 5%
Greens 3%
Don’t Know 71%

 

 

‘A Wales That Works For You’

Labour 13%
Conservatives 5%
Plaid Cymru 7%
Liberal Democrats 3%
UKIP 2%
Greens 1%
Don’t Know 69%

 

‘A Strong Voice for Wales’

Labour 9%
Conservatives 4%
Plaid Cymru 17%
Liberal Democrats 2%
UKIP 2%
Greens 2%
Don’t Know 66%

 

 

‘Shake Up the Senedd’

Labour 2%
Conservatives 2%
Plaid Cymru 7%
Liberal Democrats 1%
UKIP 13%
Greens 4%
Don’t Know 71%

 

 

So there we have it. In all instances a majority did not know. In no case does more than eleven per cent get the correct answer. And in two instances, far more people identify a party with the wrong slogan than with the right one. Indeed, both cases are somewhat amusing ones: far more people thought that the UKIP slogan of ‘A Strong Voice for Wales’ was the Plaid Cymru slogan than thought ‘The Change Wales Needs’ was Plaid’s slogan. Meanwhile, UKIP’s slogan was thought to be most likely to be ‘Shake Up the Senedd’, which was actually the slogan of the Greens.

There may be a positive interpretation that can be placed on this set of results. But if there is, I haven’t thought of it yet.

Comments

  • RDH

    You expect them to find meaning and distinction in the totally meaningless and bland? “The future is surely ahead” with that.

  • Simon Banks

    There is a distinction in the slogans. Some clearly indicate a wish to be identified with change (unstated what sort of change). Some don’t. Labour so dominates Wales and has so dominated devolved Welsh government that you would not expect its slogan to stress a need for change – and the people polled were mostly right about that. You’d expect the Greens, UKIP, the Plaid and the Tories to talk about change. What is very interesting is that the Liberal Democrat slogan was perhaps the least meaningful and did not identify us as wanting change.

    To be fair to all, there’s a limit to what you can say in three or four words to a couple of million people.

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