Arts & culture, Musicology

Music in Vienna: 1700, 1800, 1900

Title-page of Johann Strauss's 'Seid umschlungen, Millionen', 1892. The title-page features an image of the exhibition space in the Prater, as well as the dedication to Brahms and a central figure of Terpsichore, the muse of the dance. In one glance, it invites potential purchasers to recognise, admire and celebrate musical Vienna and two of its leading figures, Strauss and Brahms.
Title-page of Johann Strauss's 'Seid umschlungen, Millionen', 1892. The title-page features an image of the exhibition space in the Prater, as well as the dedication to Brahms and a central figure of Terpsichore, the muse of the dance. In one glance, it invites potential purchasers to recognise, admire and celebrate musical Vienna and two of its leading figures, Strauss and Brahms.

The image of Vienna as a musical city is a familiar one and it has long been associated with many of the most significant developments in Western music. A new book by Professor David Wyn Jones explores, for the first time, the history of music within the city.

Music in Vienna: 1700, 1800, 1900, published this month by Boydell & Brewer, opens up new outlooks on music in the Austrian capital by focusing on three different epochs, bringing together social, economic and cultural context to show why Vienna has played such an important role in the history of classical music.

Here we take a look at some of the illustrations featured in the book…

 

 

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