family

The Future of Women’s Pasts

Posted on 27 July 2015 by Laura King

By Laura King, University of Leeds Understanding how families keep things and document their histories is, for me, a feminist project. The Family Archive project has an important dual purpose, in this sense. Firstly, by thinking about the records, documents and objects in people’s homes, we can find out about women’s histories, which are often
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Ways of remembering: dying and the family archive

Posted on 9 May 2015 by Laura King

By Laura King, University of Leeds Why do we try to preserve particular memories? What exactly is valuable in the process of keeping and ‘curating’ particular objects and documents that we might understand to constitute a family archive? For whose benefit is this? Some people find great pleasure in collecting particular information and items related
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Family archives and the Romans

Posted on 11 February 2015 by lizgloyn

One of the really exciting things about this project is the wide time span that we cover between us. I’m the one who goes furthest back to the past – I’m a classicist with an interest in Roman social history, who thinks a lot about how families work in the ancient world and the sort
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So what is a ‘family archive’?

Posted on 6 February 2015 by Vicky Crewe

By Laura King, Co-Investigator, University of Leeds   Is it objects, documents or memories? For some wealthier and/or aristocratic families – such as the Devonshires, owners of the grand Chatsworth estate – this might mean an actual archive that resembles the collections at the local record office. But our research project is about ‘ordinary’ people,
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Family Heirlooms in the Past

Posted on 12 January 2015 by Vicky Crewe

By Vicky Crewe, Principal Investigator, Cardiff University     Objects can carry powerful meanings, not least when they’re transformed from ordinary ‘things’ into family heirlooms. People often hold onto family items long after they’ve ceased to be useful or fashionable, treasuring them because they’re tangible links to people and places that are long gone. In
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