Devolution and Constitution

Labouring the issue

Posted on 31 May 2018 by Professor Roger Awan-Scully

Much media and academic attention on Brexit has understandably focussed on the external dimension: the complex negotiations between the UK and the EU over withdrawal and a future relationship. A great deal has also concentrated on the difficult internal politics at Westminster – with Theresa May’s government, lacking a parliamentary majority and deeply internally divided,
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Brexit and the twentieth anniversary of the Good Friday Agreement

Posted on 9 April 2018 by Dr Thomas Leahy

This month marks the twentieth anniversary of the Good Friday (Belfast) Agreement, which ended over twenty-five years of conflict in Northern Ireland. Whilst the Good Friday Agreement remains secure, its key principles of consent and self-determination are under increasing pressure from Brexit and the Democratic Unionist Party’s (DUP) political deal with the UK Conservative government.
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Brexit and Wales

Posted on 29 March 2018 by Professor Roger Awan-Scully

Wales voted for Brexit – to the undisguised shock of nearly all its political and socio-economic elites. The Leave vote severely undermined the long-cultivated self-image of Wales: a vision, sustained by the nation’s long electoral aversion to the Conservative Party, of Wales as a more politically progressive nation than its English neighbour. That vision was
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A constitutional continuum

Posted on 19 March 2018 by Glyndwr Cennydd Jones

The UK is a unitary state comprising England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales, all of which are intrinsically linked culturally and historically in modern times through shared industrial, political and international experiences. Devolution aimed to address a measure of perceptible disenchantment due to unease with over-centralisation whilst retaining sovereignty in the hands of the Westminster
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