How to reference an interview

Posted on January 5, 2016 by Stephen Ratcliffe

Let’s say that you have conducted interviews with individuals as part of your own research and you wish to cite that information. You can reference it as follows: Name of Interviewee. Year. Interviewed by name Date.   Smith, S. 2015. Interviewed by Iris Jones 18 November 2015.   Smith 2015 would appear as the citation Read moreabout How to reference an interview


Henry Stewart talks – Trial

Posted on December 16, 2015 by Stephen Ratcliffe

The Library has trial access to Henry Stewart talks – Business and Management module. This database has case studies and talks on Leadership, Management, Organization, Marketing, Strategy, International Business, Technology, Operations Finance, Economics and more. Access to these talks continues until the end of March 2016. Go to https://hstalks.com/business/ (on campus only)    



Referencing a video on Learning Central

Posted on November 24, 2015 by Susan Smith

To reference a video on Learning Central use the following format: Name of author/organisation who created video. Year. Title of video. Name of module [Online]. University. Available at: URL of virtual learning environment [Accessed: Day month year]. Example:  Grangetown Community Gateway. 2015. Steve Duffy on business forums. Business Management Year 2.  Cardiff University. Available at: Read moreabout Referencing a video on Learning Central



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New eBook collection – Wiley Online Library

Posted on October 20, 2015 by Stephen Ratcliffe

The library service is pleased to announce that it has acquired the Wiley Online Library collection for this academic year. The collection contains over 16,000  eBook titles and the content encompasses a broad range of subjects including the humanities, social sciences and STM subjects (scientific, technical and medical). The collection is  comprised of a variety of newer Read moreabout New eBook collection – Wiley Online Library




Finding your H-Index: An Overview for Academic Staff

Posted on September 29, 2015 by Susan Smith

The H-Index was introduced in 2005 by the American physicist Professor Jorge Hirsch* and has become a popular bibliometric as it measures the author’s productivity (number of papers) and impact (number of citations). The H-Index has been seen as a fairer way of measuring an author’s work compared to other bibliometric measures – these include, Read moreabout Finding your H-Index: An Overview for Academic Staff